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Stanford scholar illuminates how 1903 Kishinev pogrom happened, and its cultural impact today

(Image credit: Tony Ronaldo)
Apr 24 2018

Widely regarded as a prototype for the Holocaust, the Kishinev pogrom spurred international ramifications, pushing Jewish political groups to organize and leading to the United States allowing relatively unrestricted immigration for Jews. But how and why the riot happened became largely misunderstood by the public in the midst of false accusations and forged documents that clouded reality. Some of these misconceptions still persist today, Stanford historian Steven Zipperstein says.

Zipperstein, the Daniel E. Koshland Professor in Jewish Culture and History, analyzed the aftermath of the pogrom and used new archival evidence to shed light on how and why the riot happened. The research is the subject of his new book, Pogrom: Kishinev and the Tilt of History.

Read more about professor Zipperstein's analysis here:

Stanford scholar illuminates how 1903 Kishinev pogrom happened, and its cultural impact today