Thursday, May 9, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm
German occupation memorial in Rostov

CISAC Conf. Room, Encina Hall Central (2nd floor)

Free and open to the public  /  Lunch will be served

 

We know that history plays a major role in socialization in Russia, and that political identities there are often defined in historical terms. This talk will analyze some re-interpretations of Russian and international history that have been employed in constructing the country's post-Soviet national identity. At the center of the new historical myth is the Great Patriotic War, both as a tragedy and a victory. However, the new narrative promoted by President Vladimir Putin...

Thursday, November 7, 2013 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Annenberg Auditorium, Cummings Art Building, Stanford University

"Anthropology of Cultural Models: Two Ways of Appropriating History in the 1920s"

Today two anthropological models dominate academic discourse: one places humans in a technological network and defines them as post-human. The other places humans among animals. However, the technological and the vitalist approaches often come together and (as an inseparable couple) define human relation to history. Thislecture will focus on two anthropological models of the 1920s: one formalist (Shklovsky, Tynianov) and the other one, far ...

Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 6:30pm - 9:00pm

Annenberg Auditorium, Cummings Art Building, Stanford University

This documentary film tells the story of Dragica Srzentić, whose century-long life offers insight into the rarely mentioned aspects of the ex-Yugoslav intellectual and ideological maze of the eight states in which this Istrian-born woman has lived - Austria-Hungary, the Kingdom of Italy, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, the Independent State of Croatia, The Federal People’s Republic of Yugoslavia, the Federal Socialist Republic of Yugoslavia, Croatia, and Serbia.

In view of Dragica Srzentić’s experiences as a member of the Yugoslav resistance during the Nazi...

Friday, October 25, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

McClatcy Hall, 450 Serra Mall, Bldg. 120

Open only to Stanford affiliates.

RSVP requested

Friday, November 1, 2013 - 12:00pm

Encina Hall, Philippines Room

In this seminar, I will explore Muslim minority representation in 25 Western and 20 post-communist legislatures, using descriptive and inferential statistics as well as qualitative and historical comparisons.  On average, Muslims remain severely underrepresented in most Western legislatures, while they are almost proportionately represented in most post-communist ones.  In explaining this variation, I will focus on forms of "consociational" power-sharing (including legacies of Communist-era affirmative action and multi-confessional power...

Monday, November 4, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

"The American Disease and the Soviet Cure: Neurasthenia and the Making of the Socialist Sanatorium"

ABSTRACT:  In the late 19th century, George Beard described neurasthenia as the "American disease," the product of a competitive and faster paced lifestyle. In the 1920s, however, Soviet doctors found that the pressures of revolutionary life were also causing nervous exhaustion. A vast "rest" apparatus was developed, including health resorts, where workers were offered a rich array of treatments, among which were many forms of hydro- and...

Monday, November 18, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

During the Second World war and its immediate aftermath, East-Central Europe experienced a concerted effort to redraw political borders and adjust them to the ethno-scoial map. A key policy in this drive was population exchange. Based on the mass population exchange between Poland and the Soviet Ukraine, this talk will address different aspects of the phenomenon of population transfers, such as their relations to wartime experience, common features of the various postwar transfers, the distinct aspects of the Soviet conception and practice of this orchestrated peaceful migration, and,...

Friday, November 8, 2013 - 11:00am - 12:00pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

Professor Iampolski will lead a discussion of his article, "Point - Pathos - Totality."  The article is available upon request.

Open only to Stanford affiliates.

RSVP requested

Friday, November 15, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

History Corner, 200 Serra Mall, Room 307

This lecture contests the concept of Asiatic and oriental despotism and conventional taxonomies of state formations.  It shows that Russia and the Inner Asian powers in the early modern and modern periods were hardly as despotic and had more capital than Tilly and others have asserted.   These empires were characterized by flexible imperial repertoires and by widely shared political and institutional innovations, especially those regarding warfare.   This perspective shifts the analytical emphasis away from the West and provides an original explanation of the forms...

Tuesday, October 29, 2013 - 5:30pm - 7:00pm

Tresidder Memorial Union, Oak East Room (459 Lagunita Drive)

Germany's ethnic citizenship law, the Soviet Union's inscription of ethnic origins in personal identification documents, and Turkey's prohibition on the public use of minority languages underpinned the 20th century definition of nationhood in these countries. Despite many challenges from political and social actors, these policies did not change until the turn of the 21st century, when Russia removed ethnicity from the internal passport, Germany opened the citizenship route to many immigrants, and Turkish state television began to broadcast in minority languages such as...

Sunday, October 20, 2013 (All day) - Thursday, October 24, 2013 (All day)
 
TESLA: MASTER OF LIGHTNING - Sunday, October 20, 4:50 PM
THE SECOND MEETING -Sunday, October 20, 4:50 PM
WHERE IS MY HOME - Thursday, October 24, 7:00 PM
 

 

TESLA: MASTER OF LIGHTNING (USA, 87 min)
Sunday October 20, 4:50 PM
Aquarius Theatre, 430 Emerson St. Palo Alto
 
Director/Producer: Robert Uth...
Tuesday, November 12, 2013 - 7:00pm - 9:00pm

Jordan Hall, Building 420 (450 Serra Mall)

“This film sets out as a cultural travelog, but before long Marker takes us on an irony filled stream-of-consciousness ride through Siberia that is less of a journalistic journey than an impressionistic one.” -Andy Ratzsch, frivolousdisorder.com

Discussion to follow.

Free and open to the public.

Part of a film series sponsored by Modern Thought & Literature, FIlm and Media Studies Program, CREEES, and the Division of International, Comparative and Area Studies. More information.

Friday, December 6, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

In the early eighteenth century, the cult of Bohdan Khmelnytsky as the mid-seventeenth-century founder of the Cossack Hetmanate and the liberator of his people from "Polish bondage" took full shape. Answering the Ukrainian elite’s needs for historical legitimacy in the decades after the Russian victory at the Battle of Poltava (1709), the Khmelnytsky cult served as a justification for Ukrainian autonomy and privileges. The talk will examine the depiction of Khmelnytsky in the Hrabianka chronicle or “Events of the Most Bitter War,” the most widely disseminated...

Thursday, December 5, 2013 - 5:30pm - 7:30pm

Fisher Conference Center, Arrillaga Alumni Center

Speakers: 
Frank Sysyn, Director of the Peter Jacyk Centre for Ukrainian Historical Research at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies
Norman Naimark, Robert & Florence McDonnell Professor of East European Studies and the Sakurako and William Fisher Family Director of the Division of International, Comparative and Area Studies
 
Moderator:
Amir Weiner, Associate Professor of Soviet...
Tuesday, November 19, 2013 - 6:00pm - 9:00pm

Cubberley Auditorium, Graduate School of Education (485 Lasuen Mall)

Celebrate Estonia's rich culture and history through film at Estonian Cultural Evning at Stanford University.

EVENT SCHEDULE:

"The Woman Who Gave Estonia a Gift of a Museum: Olga Kistler-Ritso"
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
 
Tour of Green Library and its Estonian Collection
7:00 pm - 7:30 pm
 
Snack...

Cummings Art Building, Room 103 (435 Lasuen Mall)

Select Mondays
5:15-8:05
 
About
This year-long seminar explores the creation and operations of sacred space in Byzantium by focusing on the intersection of architecture, acoustics, music, and ritual. Leading scholars from the US and abroad will present their current research and lead the discussion.
 
Sessions
November 4, 2013 with Alexander Lingas
January 27, 2014 with Wieslaw Woszczyk
February 24, 2014 with Christian...
Wednesday, October 30, 2013 - 5:15pm - 6:15pm

Pigott Hall (Building 260), Room 216

The push and pull between language innovators and archaists in Russia dates back at least two centuries to the time of Shishkov and Karamzin and takes on particularly acute cultural meaning during times of radical social change. Particularly when members of a society in flux are looking for alternative guideposts and anchors, language becomes a potent symbol of continuity and change, of traditional and new thinking, of stability and innovation. In the most recent rendition of this battle for authority and identity through language, the period of change (beginning with perestroika and...

Wednesday, November 6, 2013 - 5:15pm - 6:05pm

Pigott Hall (Building 260), Room 216

Scattered throughout the South of the Russian Empire was a form of stone statuary commonly referred to as kamennye baby, or stone women. Long the subject of archaeological speculation, often of the wildest sort, the statuary became the object of sustained artistic attention during the modernist period in Russia. In this talk, Michael Kunichika examines an episode in the career of Russian modernist appropriation of the statuary, when the poet Sergei Bobrov and the artist Natal'ia Goncharova laid claim to the statue as evidence of Russian's own "native antiquity" and of its...

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

History Corner, Room 307

For the past 13 years, Russian leader Vladimir Putin has conducted an annual televised phone-in show, Telemost, during which he responds to questions posed by his citizens. The stenographic records of these meetings provide interesting material on the image of political power in Russia. They offer insight into what kind of image of a political leader is promoted by the Kremlin, i.e. what features of a leader are emphasized, how society is reflected onto itself by the creators of Telemost and, last but not least, they reveal the background of this PR-process. Furthermore, the evolution of...

Wednesday, November 20, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Seminar Room
Building 500, Room 106
488 Escondido Mall
Stanford Archaeology Center Lunch Club Lecture Series
with Liisi Eglit & Kadri Viires
 
About: We will be talking about the establishment and activities of the Museum of Occupations in Estonia, Tallinn; the background of SUL's Baltic iniative and our recent activities and projects; Kistler-Ritso Foundation as the organization behind both the creative of the museum and SUL. We also have a short film about Olga Ritso Kistler, the founder of Kistler-Ritso Foundation, made as a collaborative project between SUL, Stanford Video and the...
Monday, January 27, 2014 - 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Pigott Hall (Bldg 260, Room 113)
Stanford University

Russia as a great power is a long-standing yet often misunderstood subject, too often separated from considerations of Russia’s realistic foreign policy options, given the country’s geography, neighbors, institutional makeup, and aspirations.  Stalin’s dictatorial regime and terror are much studied, yet rarely linked sufficiently to the question of Russian power in the world.  How can we best combine the study of Russian power in the world and Stalin’s ascent and actions as dictator?   What is it about Russia that helped bring about a Stalin?...

Friday, January 31, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

This seminar will discuss Eric Lohr’s book, Russian Citizenship, which traces the Russian state’s citizenship policy throughout history. Focusing on the period from the mid-nineteenth century to the consolidation of Stalin’s power in the 1930s, Lohr considers whom the state counted among its citizens and whom it took pains to exclude. His research reveals that the Russian attitude toward citizenship was less xenophobic and isolationist and more similar to European attitudes than has been previously thought—until the drive toward autarky after 1914...

Friday, February 28, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Talk has been cancelled and Dr. Guth will instead present at the Stanford-Berkeley Conference.

At the 20th Party Congress in 1956, Khrushchev had a nuclear scientist envision a radiant future where the atom would power industries in remote regions and turn deserts into gardens. Two decades later, the vision had become a reality on the desert peninsula of Mangyshlak in Western Kazakhstan - a region uninviting for permanent settlement, but abundant in natural resources. Dubbed the first city of the Scientific-Technological Revolution, the nuclear oasis of Shevchenko relied on a fast breeder reactor for water desalination and energy production....

Thursday, January 23, 2014 - 6:30pm - 9:00pm

Cummings Art Building, ART2
435 Lasuen Mall

A Film Showing of Yael Bartana’s “Mary Koszmary” (“Nightmares”) and Conversation with Co-Screenwriter and Lead Actor, Slawomir Sierakowski, Founding Director of Krytyka Polityczna.

Sierakowski will discuss the complex social, cultural, and political relationships between Jews, Poles, and other Europeans in the age of globalization and explore how nostalgia for the Jewish past among liberal Polish intellectuals intersects with progressive politics in Poland today. 

Slawomir Sierakowski, a Polish sociologist and...

Friday, February 14, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

Ethan Pollock’s current research project tells the history of the Russian bathhouse (bania) in order to gain new perspectives on Russian identity, traditional and modern notions of health and hygiene, and the evolution of ideas about community and sociability. It is under contract with Oxford University Press.

Ethan Pollock has examined previously-inaccessible Soviet archives to analyze the intersection of political power, official ideology, and scientific knowledge in the Soviet Union.

An associate professor of history at Brown University, he...

Friday, February 7, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

Numerous well known Western intellectuals were favorably impressed by various 20th century dictators of different political persuasions including Mussolini, Hitler, Stalin, Mao, Castro and others. Their positive assessments (short lived, or more enduring) were closely related to the appreciation of the political systems the dictators presided over, as well as the ideals which ostensibly inspired these systems. The same intellectuals were also attracted to what they perceived to be the personal attributes of the dictators.

Given the widely held belief that intellectuals are...

Thursday, January 23, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

A lunchtime discussion with political commentator Slawomir Sierakowski, founding director of Krytyka Polityczna (Political Critique), the largest progressive political movement in eastern Europe.

Mr. Sierakowski will discuss the formation and mission of the movement, engagement of an international network of progressive intellectuals, and the process of reinventing a new European left. He will also explore the difference between party politics and the political in Poland and between protests and social movements on the global stage.

Readings in advance of the...

History Corner, Room 030
Stanford University

Tuesdays at 7:00 PM

Films with English subtitles from Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Turkmenistan.

Winter Quarter

January 14 - Qyz-Jibek (The Lady-Silk), a classic Kazakh film of 1970

January 28 - Birjan Sal, Kazakh film 2009

February 11 - Seker (Sugar), Kazakh film 2009

February 25 - The Light Thief (aka Svet-Ake), Kyrgyz film 2010

March 11 - Shal (The Old Man), Kazakh film 2012

 

Spring Quarter

April 8 - Strizh (Shorn), Kazakh film 2007

April 22 - Qaroi...

Tuesday, March 4, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Okimoto Room 
Encina Hall Central

It can be argued whether or not Lion Feuchtwanger’s travelogue “Moscow 1937” did indeed spawn “one of the greatest scandals in the history of world literature”, as an internet commentary claims. Nevertheless, it is beyond contention that the lean book did already polarize opinions when it was first published in 1937 and continues to evoke strong reactions to this day. Already the reaction of contemporaries was – apart from a few exceptions – dismissive; since then, the tenor has rather become more critical: The travelogue is nowadays...

Friday, March 7, 2014 - 9:15am - 5:30pm
Bechtel Confernce Center
Encina Hall (616 Serra Street)
 

What is emancipation today? Which movements and forces currently at work in the vast area spanning Eastern Europe to Asia should be considered emancipatory and why? Which among the rich history of socio-political, cultural, and economic events in the region -- events that have at different times either been linked to, or critically dissociated from, the ideas of progress,...

Monday, March 10, 2014 - 4:15pm - 6:00pm

Braun Music Center, Room 103

Part of the Ron Alexander Memorial Lectures in Musicology.
Co-sponsored with the Slavic Department.

 

Free and open to the public.

 
Tuesday, March 11, 2014 - 5:30pm - 7:00pm

Levinthal Hall (Stanford Humanities Center)

Recent ethnographies of post-revolutionary Iran have tended to focus on  youthful expressions of discontent and rebellion against the Islamic state among middle-class urban dwellers, while taking little account of other socio-economic groups and  subject positions in this vast country. But focusing on the treatment of the large population of Afghan refugees that exists on the margins of Iranian society offers intriguing possibilities for recognising that the Islamic Republic's current exercise of statecraft owes more to an opportunistic realpolitik than to Islamic solidarity...

Monday, February 24, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm


Philippines Conference Room

Sports and politics are inevitably intertwined and nowhere more than in the Olympic Games. Amidst the controversy surrounding the Games of 1980 in Moscow was the sailing regatta in the Estonian capital of Tallinn. A sporting event taking place in an occupied country, as Estonia had been annexed by the Soviet Union in 1940, posed a dilemma for the national Olympic committees and, especially, for emigrant Estonians. Although it is generally assumed that the Estonian population opposed the event, an analysis of the discussion within the Estonian government-in-exile shows variations on the...

Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 6:00pm
Slav Dom
650 Mayfield Avenue 
 

Join us for an evening dinner event to learn more about the Center, grants, fellowships, travel and internships, courses, on-campus events, study abroad and more.

RSVP requested.

Friday, April 18, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

This seminar will examine the process by which Soviet camera operators confronted and decided to film sights of Nazi atrocity, and inserted them within a narrative frame. We will examine the conventions imposed by the Soviet visual media upon representations of this suffering, consider how these conventions shape understanding for audiences then and now, and compare these visual grammars of what we came to know as the Holocaust with those that govern images generated by the perpetrators or by the Western Allies in their images of the liberation of the camps. Finally, we will reflect upon...

Thursday, April 17, 2014 - 5:30pm - 7:00pm

Cummings Art Building, ART2

The famous photograph and newsreel film of the raising of the Soviet flag over Berlin’s Reichstag in May 1945 have been frequently recycled to stand for the end of war and the Soviet part of victory in it. While there have been many analyses of these images as falsifications of the actual events of the storm of the Reichstag, their rich symbolic power as what have been called ‘iconic images’ evoking a momentous historical event has been undiminished. This lecture will examine the uses that this imagery has been put to in films from The Fall of Berlin (1949) to...

Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 7:00pm - 9:00pm
CERAS building room 101, Stanford Graduate School of Education
520 Galvez Mall, Stanford University 
 
Two short films focusing on Russia

Holy Warriors
(30 minutes) Russia
Director: Marianna Yarovskaya 
http://www.unaff.org/2007/f_holy.html

Undesirables
(30 minutes) Russia
Director: Marianna Yarovskaya 
http://www.unaff.org/1999/...
Tuesday, March 11, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

History Corner, Room 307

There have been four "resets" in US-Russian relations since the fall of the USSR. Each one has begun with high expectations and each has ended in disappointment. In recent months the triple challenges of Snowden, Syria and Sochi have exemplified  the difficulties of creating a sustainable, productive partnership. What are the prospects for Washington and Moscow moving the relationship forward in the run-up to the G-8 meeting this June? Stent will offer a historical perspective on the limited US-Russian partnership and discuss prospects for the future. 

...
Monday, April 7, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

More than ever before ethnographic film nowadays deals with contemporary social problems and serves to address current political issues. Traditional society, long the most common topic of such films in Serbia and in the Balkans, is now almost extinct.  Still, there are some similar values maintained in modern society. Thus, these films often demonstrate first-hand experiences of ordinary people and, therefore, should be regarded as an invaluable testimony of reality in time and space . Ethnographic films can showcase an exciting cultural blend of Serbia today...

Friday, April 11, 2014 - 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Please note the start time has changed

Levinthal Hall
Stanford Humanities Center


Presenters:

Mark von Hagen, Professor of History, Arizona State University
Vlad Lupan, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Moldova to the UN
Yaroslav Prytula, Associate Profesor, Lviv Ivan Franko National University

Moderator:

Robert Crews

 

Mark von Hagen teaches the history of Eastern Europe and Russia, with a focus on Ukrainian-Russian relations, at Arizona State University, after teaching 24 years at Columbia University, where he also chaired...

Friday, April 25, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

History Corner, Room 307

While in the last 25 years the history of women historians in Western Europe and the United States and their contributions to historiography have been widely researched, women historians in the Russian Empire have been totally ignored. This talk presents fifty women, born between 1804 and 1884, who can be identified as historians (in a broad sense), in order to outline their collective biography, including their family backgrounds, fathers, brothers and husbands, education, occupations, and political activities. These women of different ethnic origins made significant contributions to...

Tuesday, April 29, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Encina Hall West, Room 204

In the 1940s and 1950s, thousands of Ukrainian women joined the underground nationalist movement in western Ukraine as members of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) and the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA). However, the roles they played and their contribution to this movement remain understudied, marginalized and trivialized in historical research. While historians tend to represent women mainly as victims or martyrs of the guerrilla war, women’s personal recollections give a somewhat different picture.

The study of personal narratives of former female insurgents...

Friday, May 23, 2014 - 12:30pm - 2:00pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

This presentation uses Russian social media as a lens for exploring the relationship between individuals, society and online communication technologies. It proposes a framework for comparative international analysis that leverages three interconnected elements – history, network structure and media ecology. On the basis of these three elements, Alexanyan examines Russia’s social media ecology and its relationship to Russia’s broader socio-political environment, articulating the various factors that have influenced the specific evolution of social media in...

Wednesday, April 2, 2014 - 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Levinthal Hall, Stanford Humanities Center
(424 Santa Teresa St)
 

Dariusz Stola is the newly appointed director of Museum of the History of the Polish Jews, which will open in Warsaw in October 2014.  Dr. Stola is an historian and former professor at the Institute of Political Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences, and at Collegium Civitas in Warsaw as well as a fellow at the Center for Migration Research, Warsaw University. He has published eight books and over a hundred articles on Polish-Jewish relations and the Holocaust, international migrations in the 20th century, and on the communist regime in Poland, as well as on Polish...

Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 5:30pm - 7:30pm

Cummings Art Building, ART2

African-Americans occupied a small but significant space in the Socialist Realist imagination of the Soviet Union in the 1930s. Soviet artists eagerly demonstrated the purported racial tolerance of socialism, in accordance with the doctrines of internationalism and anti-colonialism, by producing critical visual representations of the plight of African-Americans.  The painter Aleksandr Deineka visited the US in 1935 and exhibited his paintings of African-Americans on his return to Moscow to great acclaim: critics focused approvingly, and predictably, on how his paintings evoked...

Tuesday, April 22, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

Meady-rade is art that suspends itself, denies itself from our experience. Meady-rade is invisible and inaudible and intangible art. But the very intangibility is intangible. The very invisibility is invisible. Most often when we don’t see something, we do not perceive its absence. That which we do not hear is hidden in the silence, but that very silence is inaudible, hidden from us.  Why this is the case needs to be examined in each manifestation of meady-rade art individually. The motives may be aesthetic, political, ethical, religious, psychological, etc.  The...

Monday, April 14, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

History Corner, Room 307

A group of researchers from the European University at St. Petersburg conducted in 2011-2013 perhaps the first major cross-cultural study in Russia in the last 25 years, comparing patterns of technological entrepreneurship in Tomsk, Novosibirsk, Kazan and St. Petersburg, on the one hand, and those in Korea, Taiwan and Finland, on the other. Fieldwork undertaken in all 4 countries has shown that Russian high tech entrepreneurs distinguish themselves from their peers in Asia and Europe by putting a marked emphasis on the value of creativity and inspiration, which frequently blocks the way...

Thursday, April 3, 2014 - 4:00pm - Saturday, April 5, 2014 - 3:00pm

University of California, Berkeley

(see schedule for specific workshop locations)

In his 1944 Christmas broadcast, Edvard Beneš of Czechoslovakia proclaimed that the Second World War had unleashed a powerful political and social revolution in Europe. Over the past decade, researchers have gained unprecedented access to new archival sources to help us reexamine this claim. This workshop invites advanced doctoral students and junior scholars to present original research and new methodological approaches to the post-war era, broadly defined. Working together in a congenial setting alongside invited experts, we hope to gain a deeper understanding of the political,...

Tuesday, June 3, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

History Corner, Room 307

The presentation summarizes preliminary findings of my research project on Allied policy towards resistance groups during World War II and its impact on post-war political and ideological divisions.

The research is linked with a multiplicity of historical problems: the western Allies’ balance of political and military considerations during World War II; the Anglo-American cooperation and competition in the field of intelligence; the use of special operations as an instrument of foreign policy, especially in regard to countries where the development of resistance movements had...

Friday, May 2, 2014 - 10:30am - 12:00pm

Wallenberg Learning Theater
Building 160, Room 124



Battling Discrimination: The Roma and the European Union
Ana Bracic, Postdoctoral Fellow, CDDRL

Reform and Hesitation: Collaboration Between West European and East European Cultural Institutions during the EU Enlargement Process, A Case Study of the European Roma Library Project
Sreten Ugričić, CREEES Visiting Scholar

Fighting Corruption in Eastern Europe: The Role of the European Union
Patricia Young, Postdoctoral Fellow, Sociology Department

Moderated by: Branislav Jakovljevic,...

Saturday, April 26, 2014 (All day) - Tuesday, April 29, 2014 (All day)

See website for schedule

Fourth Edition of the Romanian Film Festival and Discussion Forum will take place April 26- 29, themed:

TRANSITIONS: SPIRITUALITY AND CONTEMPORARY LIFE IN ROMANIA

The Romanian Film Festival at Stanford, UC Berkeley and San Francisco State University, 2014 edition centers on the theme “TRANSITIONS: Spirituality and Contemporary Life in Romania” with a selection of films featuring award-winning filmmakers while also introducing new artists.  The audience will have the opportunity to view and experience the complex aspects of Romanian cinema...

Thursday, May 8, 2014 - 5:30pm - 7:00pm

Jordan Hall, Room 041
(450 Serra Mall)

Post-socialist historicization has often not left space for the possibility that socialist art and architecture could have allowed for identifications with the socialist project outside the context of state socialism. Did the socialist state maintain a monopoly on the socialist project? Could socialist art and architecture have been more faithful to socialism than the socialist state? And could counter-histories of socialist art and architecture re-frame the post-socialist present? This talk will explore these and related questions by looking at monuments to Yugoslavia’s history,...

Friday, May 9, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

Please note Dr. Herscher's talk has been changed from "Missing Persons, Political Subjects, and Public Spaces of Disappearance"

 “Post-conflict reconstruction” has emerged after the Cold War as a global form of humanitarian and development assistance.  While this reconstruction is almost always described and analysed as an objective response to the destruction of the post-conflict environment, I explore it as a means of constituting that environment as an object of knowledge and action in the first place. In this project, I focus on the...

Monday, May 12, 2014 - 6:30pm - 7:30pm

Cubberley Auditorium

Latvia, one of the three Baltic states, is a small energetic country with a rich culture and history. Through wars, occupations, and repressions, Latvians have been able to sustain their language, culture and national memory, which have enabled the country to recover from the half-century long Soviet annexation with an enormous speed after regaining the independence in 1991. Today, Latvians in Latvia and abroad look into the future with enthusiasm and confidence, while emphasizing the importance of remembering and commemorating their past.

Stanford University Libraries' Baltic...

Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Okimoto Room, Bechtel Conference Center

The tale of the development of modern Scandinavian and Baltic identities is most frequently told against the background of differences of political inclination and ideological bent.  Identity formation, however, has been closely intertwined with technical advances, the formation of aesthetic schemes, and the materiality of media, image sound, time and space. How has the encounter with new types of materiality reinforced the conviction that identity, if not migrated to new platforms, is an endangered species?

Dr. Janis Kreslins is the Senior Academic Librarian...

Monday, April 28, 2014 - 5:15pm - 8:05pm

Cummings Art Buillding, Room 103

Part of the Aural Architecture series

Topic: comparing architecture and liturgy of Georgia and Armenia with Jerusalem

More: Aural Architecture series

Thursday, May 1, 2014 - 12:15pm - 1:30pm

McCaw Hall, Arrillaga Alumni Center

José Manuel Barroso, President of the European Commission, will be at Stanford on May 1st to deliver his talk, "Global Europe, from the Atlantic to the Pacific."  President Barroso's political career began in 1980 when he joined the Social Democratic Party (PSD). He was named President of the party in 1999 and re-elected three times. During the same period, he served as Vice President of the European People's Party. As State Secretary for Foreign Affairs and...

Friday, May 16, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Koret-Taube Conference Center

Michael McFaul is the former US Ambassador to Russia.  He was previously chief advisor on Russia and Eurasia to President Obama, and Senior Director at the National Security Council from 2008-2011. He is the former director of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law and deputy director of Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University.  He is also the Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, where he co-directs the Iran Democracy Project, ans well as Professor of Political Science and CISAC...

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

History Corner, Room 307

Despite being distant in time and space, the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan has often served as a backdrop against which the war in Chechnya has been interpreted. This is the point of departure for an investigation into the visual representations of these two conflicts. More specifically, my research is concerned with the question how Soviet and Russian newspapers visually represented the wars in Afghanistan and Chechnya at the time they took place. Do pictures of war give a clue about the telos and ethos of the conflict? What identities have been visually produced, particularly with...

Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

White Plaza

Learn about the 15 international programs as well as collaborative projects, degrees and courses offered, internships, funding for student research, and much more. More

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Cubberley Auditorium

Synopsis: Franek and Jozek Kalina, sons of a poor farmer, are brothers from a small village in central Poland. Franek immigrated to the United States in the 80’s, and cut all ties with his family.  Only when Jozek’s wife arrives in the US, without explanation, does Franek finally return to his homeland. Franek discovers that Jozek has been ostracized from the community, and constantly receives various threats. As Franek and Jozek struggle to rebuild their relationship, they are drawn into a gothic tale of intrigue. The two brothers eventually...

Tuesday, May 20, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

History Corner, Room 307

Saparmurat Niyazov, aka “Turkmenbashy, ruled independent Turkmenistan between 1991 and 2006, becoming world-notorious for promoting a cult of his own personality that reached in the early 2000s almost unprecedented levels. Such cult was often the object of sensational reports and condescendent mocking by Western observers, but few tried to analyze it in depth and even less to explain why such a cult was developed and why it befell Turkmenistan to be its cradle. A comparative perspective that takes into account both similarities and differences with...

Friday, May 30, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

“Descent and Space in Tchaikovsky’s Liturgy”
Brigid Connor

“The School of Courage: Memoirs, Diaries, and Reports of the Soviet War in Afghanistan”
Jacob Parsley

“Nuclear Canary: The Soviet Union’s Early Warning Network”
Charles Powell

“Dancing Propaganda: Soviet Folk Dance Ensembles and Western Audiences”
Caroline Schottenhamel

“Geopolitics, Identity, and Ethnography in the Tajik Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic...

Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - 7:00pm - 9:00pm

Braun Corner, Room 105
(Building 320, 450 Serra Mall)

Loves of a Blond (Czechoslovakia, Directed by milos Forman, 1965)
An all girls' boarding school farce adapted to Czechoslovakia before the Prague Spring

Q&A with Michael Mitzer to follow.

Free and open to the public.

Part of a film series sponsored by Stanford Global Studies Division. More information.

Monday, September 22, 2014 - 5:30pm - 7:00pm

Pigott Hall (Building 260, Room 113)

*Please note the date has changed from September 23 to September 22

A talk by Arnold Suppan, author of Hitler - Beneš - Tito: Conflict, War and Genocide in East Central and South East Europe.The monograph explores the development of the political, legal, economic, social, cultural and military “communities of conflict” within Austria-Hungary (especially in the Bohemian and South Slav lands); the convulsion of World War I and the Czech, Slovak and South Slav break with the Habsburg Monarchy; the difficult formation of successor states and the strong discussions at Paris 1919/20; the domestic and foreign policies of...

Friday, October 3, 2014 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm

Campbell Recital Hall, Braun Music Center

Flowers of the Czech Music from Prague  (Květy české hudby z Prahy)

A concert featuring Prague's National Opera singer Martina Kociánová, accompanied by violinist Oldřich Vlček and pianist Sára Bukovská. The first part of the program will present compositions of great Czech composers and the second part will feature a commemoration of traditional Czech and Moravian folk songs.

Preview of the program:

A.Dvořák :    Sonata for the violing and piano (Sonatina pro housle a klavír)
A....

Tuesday, October 21, 2014 - 5:30pm - 7:00pm

History Corner, Room 002
(450 Serra Mall, Building 200)

Russian expansion into Central Asia in the 19th century is usually seen either as the product of lobbying by big capitalist interests in Moscow, or as a wholly unplanned process driven by ‘men on the spot’ who slipped beyond St Petersburg’s control. This paper is a micro-study of one of the campaigns which immediately preceded the fall of Tashkent in 1865, during which Russian forces under General M. G. Cherniaev united the Orenburg and Siberian ‘lines’ of fortification to create what was meant to be a permanent new frontier on the steppe. It demonstrates that...

Monday, October 27, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

Nowhere in the world was the sport of biathlon, a combination of cross-country skiing and rifle marksmanship, taken more seriously than in the Soviet Union, and no other nation garnered greater success at international venues. From the introduction of modern biathlon in 1958 to the USSR's demise in 1991, athletes representing the Soviet Union won almost half of all possible medals awarded in world championship and Olympic competition. Biathletes of the USSR were so dominant that at major events their victory was often a foregone conclusion. Yet more than sheer technical skill created...

Thursday, November 6, 2014 - 6:00pm - 7:30pm

Pigott Hall (Building 260, Room 113)

Ukraine: What is the fighting all about?

It has been a year since Ukrainian activists took to the streets of Kyiv to protest the decision of then-president Viktor Yanukovich not to sign an Association Agreement with the European Union. This Maidan 2 revolution was struggling for fair governance, human rights, against corruption and cynicism of power brokers, and for the chance to pursue a better, European future. Then the revolution was brutally suppressed by police squads, the protests radicalized, and Yanukovich fled the country.

However, a European Ukraine...

Friday, October 24, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

Using the example of Polish border regions, the presentation examines the phenomenon of borders and border regions in connection with neighbourhood relations from the end of the Second World War until today. At what point does a border become a border region? How did neighbourhood relations develop in the course of Polish history? How far have the respective neighbours progressed in overcoming prejudice and stereotypes? These questions will be discussed within the context of Poland’s western border with Germany and her eastern borders with Russia and Ukraine. How did the perceptions...

Friday, September 26, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

The lecture, based on the life of Tsola Dragoitcheva (1898-1993), a Bulgarian political functionary during state socialism, presents (her) biography as a useful historical tool which allows scholars to find a balance between treating women from patriarchal contexts as agents of change or as individuals constrained by historical structures. As such, it contributes to the ongoing debate regarding the condition of women and gender relations in the East European socialist countries during the Cold War period.

Krassimira Daskalova is a CREEES visiting scholar and...

Thursday, October 16, 2014 - 6:00pm - 7:30pm

Pigott Hall, Room 113
(450 Serra Mall, Building 260)

The presentation will place Shevchenko in the context of Ukrainian society of the 1830s-1840s, focusing on the impact of his poetry and the effect of his charismatic persona on his readers -- peasants (including his brother Varfolomij, a serf), both the Ukrainian and Russian intelligentsia and gentry, and representatives of the Russian imperial court. The reception of Shevchenko exposes the boundaries of the Ukrainian (and Little Russian) discourse (literature, folklore, history) within Russian imperial culture and the limits of what has been termed...

Tuesday, September 30, 2014 - 3:00pm - 4:30pm

Fisher Conference Center, Arrillaga Alumni Center

Participants:

Miroslav Lajcak, Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of the Slovak Republic
Michael McFaul, Professor, Political Science; Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution and Freeman Spogli Institute
Norman Naimark, The Sakurako and William Fisher Family Director of the Stanford Global Studies Division and Robert and Florence McDonnell Professor in East European Studies
Kathryn Stoner, Faculty Director, Susan Ford Dorsey Program in International Policy Studies and Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute

Co-sponsored by The Europe Center

...

Monday, November 17, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Philippines Conference Room
Encina Hall, 3rd floor

By the end of 1944, the Red Army had reconquered the Soviet western borderlands from the Germans. Investigating what their citizens had done under Nazi occupation was a task of utmost importance for the returning Soviet authorities. What did you do during the war – this question, however, was not only of concern to party-state officials and the secret police. It also hovered over private and public encounters between returning evacuees and colleagues, soldiers and family members, Holocaust survivors and their neighbors. Focusing on Belorussia, the presentation discusses what...

Friday, November 7, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

Open to Stanford affiliates. RSVP requested.

Wednesday, October 8, 2014 (All day) - Friday, October 10, 2014 (All day)

Stauffer Auditorium, Hoover Institution

An international conference featuring a Keynote Address by Vaira Vike-Freiberga, Presdent of the Club of Madrid, Former President of Latvia

Co-sponsored by Office of the Provost School of Humanities and Sciences; Office of the Dean; Stanford Global Studies Division; The Europe Center; Stanford University Libraries; Division of Literatures, Cultures & Languages; Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures; Department of History; Taube Center for Jewish Studies; Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies; Stanford Humanities Center

Sunday, October 26, 2014 - 4:45pm - 6:00pm

The Kill Team - Friday, October 17, 9:50 PM
In the Wake of Stalin - Sunday, October 19, 2:30 PM
To Kill a Sparrow - Monday, October 20, 4:00 PM
The Gold Spinners -  Sunday, October 26, 4:45 PM
 

The Kill Team (Afghanistan/USA, 79 min)

Friday, October 17, 9:50 PM
Annenberg Auditorium, Cummings Art Building (435 Lasuen Mall) Stanford University

Director: Dan Krauss
Producers: Linda Davis, Dan Krauss

Description:
The film goes behind closed doors to tell the riveting story of Specialist Adam Winfield, a twenty-one-year-old infantryman in Afghanistan who attempted with the help of his father to alert the military to heinous war crimes his platoon was committing. Tragically, his father's pleas...

Tuesday, October 21, 2014 - 7:00pm - Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 9:30pm

Select Tuesdays, 7 - 9:30 pm
Cummings Art Building, ART2

Film screenings:

Sept. 30 - Mephisto (István Szabó, 1981)
Oct. 7 - Ashes and Diamond (Andrzej Wajda, 1958)
Oct. 14 - The Red and the White (Miklós Jancsó, 1967)
Oct. 21 - Innocence Unprotected (Dušan Makavejev, 1968)
*Please note that this film has been changed from WR: Mysteries of the Organism
Oct. 28 - The Shop on Main Street (Ján Kádar, 1965)

Tuesday, October 14, 2014 - 12:15pm - 1:30pm

CISAC Conference Room, Encina Hall

Yeşim Arat  is an Aron Rodrigue International Visitor at Stanford and professor of Political Science and International Relations at Boğaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey. She is the author of The Patriarchal Paradox: Women Politicians in Turkey (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1989), Rethinking Islam and Liberal Democracy: Islamist Women in Turkish Politics (SUNY Press, 2005),Violence Against Women in Turkey (with Ayse Gul Altinay-Punto, 2009-Turkish version, 2008 Pen Duygu Asena Award) and numerous articles on women as well as Turkish politics. Arat was...

Monday, October 13, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

The talk examines the evolution of historical research and public awareness of the violent wartime and postwar history of Lithuania, particularly the 1940-1953 period, during and after the collapse of the USSR. The emphasis will be on manner in which Lithuanian historians have confronted the issues surrounding the history of the Holocaust, Soviet repression and collaboration during a period of difficult social and political transition since the late 1980s, as well as the impact on society of the contentious and often politicized nature of the historical discussions.

Saulius...

Friday, November 14, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Presenters:

Zilka Spahić-Šiljak, CREEES Visiting Scholar
Katherine Jolluck, History Department, Stanford University
Laura Stokes, History Department, Stanford University

Encina Hall West, Room 208

Dr. Zilka Spahić-Šiljak is currently is a CREEES visiting scholar. She is a research scholar and public intellectual addressing issues involving human rights, politics, religion, education and peace-building. She has worked for the past two decades as human rights activist in non-governmental organizations on the promotion of women's human rights, multireligious dialogue and reconciliation. Read her full bio here.

Open to Stanford affiliates....

Monday, October 20, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Old Union, Room 200

History, Arts and Culture of Southeastern Europe

Dubrovnik, Croatia

(excurisions to Croatian islands and cities in Bosnia and Herzegovina)

Learn more about this exciting summer study abroad opportunity!

More

Wednesday, October 29, 2014 - 6:30pm - 9:00pm

Cubberley Auditorium
(485 Lasuen Mall)

Ana Arabia film screening followed by conversation with filmmaker Amos Gitai and Q&A with the audience.

Free and open to the public.

Co-sponsored with Taube Center for Jewish Studies.

Friday, December 5, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Encina Hall West, Room 208

‘EuroMaidan’, the mass unrest in Ukraine between late 2013 and early 2014, has received countless evaluations and interpretations worldwide. Varying from the ‘revolution of dignity’ and the ‘birth of the Ukrainian political nation’ to the anarchic ‘revolt of the masses’ inspired by a nationalistic drive, it has divided the academic world into passionately supportive and passionately critical positions.

This presentation raises a number of questions:  Was EuroMaidan the repetition of a well-known scenario or a truly innovative...

Tuesday, November 4, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Bechtel International Center